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Infectious Diseases: COVID-19 - Media & Visualisations

Resources in the origins, research and containment of newly emergent and historic diseases

More COVID-19 Information

Need some data and scholarly publications? Check out the COVID-19 - Data, Publications, & Public Health Information tab for national and worldwide data, scholarly resources, and up-to-date information. 

Interested in how the pandemic is being handled in New York State? Check out the COVID-19 - New York State tab for information specific to New York State and New York City.

Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Global Case Count

Johns Hopkins CCSE (2020). Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University (JHU). Retrieved from https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

COVID-19 Heat Map Animation

Health Map COVID-19 (2020). Retrieved from https://www.healthmap.org/covid-19/

WHO: How to wear a fabric mask

WHO COVID-19 Quick Facts and Mythbusters

Fact: The prolonged use of medical masks when properly work, DOES NOT cause CO2 intoxication nor oxygen deficiency. Prolonged use of medical masks can be uncomfortable. However, it does not lead to CO2 intoxication nor oxygen deficiency. While wearing a medical mask, make sure it fits properly and that it is tight enough to allow you to breath normally. Do not re-use a disposable mask and always change it as soon as it gets damp. Medical masks (also known as surgical masks) are flat or pleated; they are affixed to the head with straps or have ear loops.
FACT: 5G mobile networks DO NOT spread COVID-19. Viruses cannot travel on radio waves/mobile networks.COVID-19 is spreading in many countries that do not have 5G mobile networks. COVID-19 is spread through respiratoatry droplets when an infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks. People can also be infected by touching a contaminated surface and then their eyes, mouth or nose.
FACT: Exposing yourself to the sun or to temperatures higher than 25C degrees DOES NOT prevent the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). You can catch COVID-19, no matter how sunny or hot the weather is. Countries with hot weather have reported cases of COVID-19. To protect yourself, make sure you clean your hands frequently and thoroughly and avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.
FACT: Being able to hold your breath for 10 seconds or more without coughing or feeling discomfort DOES NOT mean you are free from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) or any other lung disease. The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are dry cough, tiredness and fever. Some people may develop more severe forms of the disease, such as pneumonia. The best way to confirm if you have  the virus producing COVID-19 disease is with a laboratory test.  You cannot confirm it with this breathing exercise, which can even be dangerous.
FACT: COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climates. From the evidence so far, the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in ALL AREAS, including areas with hot and humid weather. Regardless of climate, adopt protective measures if you live in, or travel to an area reporting COVID-19. The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.
FACT: Cold weather and snow CANNOT kill the new coronavirus. There is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases. The normal human body temperature remains around 36.5°C to 37°C, regardless of the external temperature or weather. The most effective way to protect yourself against the new coronavirus is by frequently cleaning your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or washing them with soap and water.
FACT: Taking a hot bath does not prevent the new coronavirus disease. Taking a hot bath will not prevent you from catching COVID-19. Your normal body temperature remains around 36.5°C to 37°C, regardless of the temperature of your bath or shower. Actually, taking a hot bath with extremely hot water can be harmful, as it can burn you. The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.
FACT: The new coronavirus CANNOT be transmitted through mosquito bites. To date there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes. The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus which spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Also, avoid close contact with anyone who is coughing and sneezing.
Are hand dryers effective in killing the new coronavirus? No. Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCoV. To protect yourself against the new coronavirus, you should frequently clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Once your hands are cleaned, you should dry them thoroughly by using paper towels or a warm air dryer.
Do vaccines against pneumonia protect you against the new coronavirus? No. Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protection against the new coronavirus. The virus is so new and different that it needs its own vaccine. Researchers are trying to develop a vaccine against 2019-nCoV, and WHO is supporting their efforts. Although these vaccines are not effective against 2019-nCoV, vaccination against respiratory illnesses is highly recommended to protect your health.
Can regularly rinsing your nose with saline help prevent infection with the new coronavirus? No. There is no evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline has protected people from infection with the new coronavirus. There is some limited evidence that regularly rinsing nose with saline can help people recover more quickly from the common cold. However, regularly rinsing the nose has not been shown to prevent respiratory infections.
Can eating garlic help prevent infection with the new coronavirus? Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties. However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus.
Does the new coronavirus affect older people, or are younger people also susceptible? People of all ages can be infected by the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Older people, and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.  WHO advises people of all ages to take steps to protect themselves from the virus, for example by following good hand hygiene and good respiratory hygiene.
Are antibiotics effective in preventing and treating the new coronavirus? No, antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria. The new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus and, therefore, antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment. However, if you are hospitalized for the 2019-nCoV, you may receive antibiotics because bacterial co-infection is possible.
Are there any specific medicines to prevent or treat the new coronavirus? To date, there is no specific medicine recommended to prevent or treat the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV). However, those infected with the virus should receive appropriate care to relieve and treat symptoms, and those with severe illness should receive optimized supportive care. Some specific treatments are under investigation, and will be tested through clinical trials. WHO is helping to accelerate research and development efforts with a range or partners.
Fact: Studies show hydroxychloroquine does not have clinical benefits in treating COVID-19. Hydroxycholorquine or chloroquine, a treatment for malaria, lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, has been under study as a possible treatment for COVID-19. Current data shows that this drug does not reduce deaths among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, not help people with moderate disease. The use of hydroxycholorquine and chloroquine is accepted as generally safe for patients with malaria and autoimmune disease, but its use where not indicated and without medical supervision can cause serious side effects and should be avoided.

Ask WHO - Quick Facts about COVID-19

Should I avoid shaking hands because of the new coronavirus? Yes. Respiratory viruses can be passed by shaking hands and touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Greet people with a wave, a nod, or a bow instead.
Is wearing rubber gloves while out in public effective in preventing the new coronavirus infection? No. Regularly washing your bare hands offers more protection against catching COVID-19 than wearing rubber gloves. You can still pick up COVID-19 contamination on rubber gloves. If you then touch your face, the contamination goes from your glove to your face and can infect you.
How can I grocery shop safely in the time of COVID-19? When grocery shopping, keep at least 1-metre distance from others and avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose. If possible, sanitize the handles of shopping trolleys or baskets before shopping. Once home, wash your hands thoroughly and also after handling and storing your purchased products. There is currently no confirmed case of COVID-19 transmitted through food or food packaging.
How should I wash fruit and vegetables in the time of COVID-19? Wash them the same way you would in any other circumstance. Before handling them, wash your hands with soap and water. Then, wash the fruit and vegetables thoroughly with clean water, especially if you eat them raw.
Can COVID-19 be spread through coins and banknotes? There is currently no evidence to confirm or disprove that COVID-19 virus can be transmitted through coins or banknotes. However, respiratory droplets expelled from an infected person can contaminate and persist on surfaces. Wash your hands regularly and thoroughly after touching any frequently-touched surface or object, including coins or banknotes. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose, if your hands are not cleaned.
Do I need to use a washing machine and drier to wash and dry clothes, towels, and best linen, if no one in my house is a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patient? There is no need to use a washing machine or drier, nor extremely hot water. Do your laundry as you normally would, using detergent or soap. Once dry, make sure you clean your hands before handling and storing your clothes, towels, and bed linen.
How should I was and dry my clothes, towels, and bed linen, if someone in my household is a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patient? - Wash the patient's clothes, towels, and bed linens separately. - If possible, wear heavy-duty gloves before handling them. - Never carry soiled linen against your body; place soiled linen in a clearly labeled, leak-proof container (e.g. bag, bucket). - Scrape off solid excrement (e.g. faeces or vomit) with a flat, firm object and dispose of in the patient's toilet before putting linen in the designated container. Place the excrement in a covered bucket to dispose of in the toilet, if this is not in the patient's room. - Wash and disinfect the linen: Machine was at 60-90 degrees celsius with laundry detergent. Alternatively, soak linen in hot water and soap in a large drum, using a stick to stir, avoiding splashing. If hot water is not available, soak linen in 0.05% chlorine for approximately 30 minutes. Rinse clean with water and let linen dry in the sunlight. - Do not forget to wash your hands at the end of the process.

Vox - How coronavirus charts can mislead us

Social Distancing Visualized - by Harry Stevens

Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to "flatten the curve"

by Harry Stevens


These models were produced by Harry Stevens for the Washington Post. They model the spread of a disease in a 200 person town with different types of spread mitigation measures in place. 


Stevens, H. (2020, March 14). Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to "flatten the curve". Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/ 

The spread of a disease modeled without any social distancing measures in place.

Change Over Time - No social distancing

The spread of a disease with a forced quarantine in place, which is eventually broken.

Change Over Time - Forced Quarantine

The spread of a disease with moderate social distancing measures in place.

Change Over Time - Social Distancing Level 1

The spread of a disease with more stringent social distancing measures in place.

Change Over Time - Social Distancing Level 2

This Week in Virology - Latest COVID-19 Podcast

Racaniello, V., Condit, R., Spindler, K, & Barker, B. (2020, August 23). TWiV 666: A far-UVC light bulb went off for David Brenner [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.microbe.tv/twiv/twiv-666/

WHO Guide To Protecting Yourself and Others

WHO Guide To Protecting Yourself and Others - slide 1 - Wash your hands; Wash your hands with soap and running water when hands are visibly dirty; If your hands are not visibly dirty, frequently clean them by using alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water
WHO Guide To Protecting Yourself and Others - slide 2 - Wash your hands: after coughing or sneezing; when caring for the sick; before, during and after you prepare food; before eating; after toilet use; when hands are visibly dirty; after handling animals or animal waste
WHO Guide To Protecting Yourself and Others - slide 3 - Protect others from getting sick; When coughing and sneezing cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue; Throw tissue into closed bin immediately after use; Clean hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water after coughing or sneezing and when caring for the sick

WHO: Home Care for COVID-19

Home care for people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19: For ill people
Home care for people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19: For all members of the household
Home care for people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19: For caregivers

WHO: Mask Dos and Don'ts

How to wear a non-medical fabric mask safely: The Dos
How to wear a non-medical fabric mask safely: The Don'ts
How to wear a medical mask safely: The Dos
How to wear a medical mask safely: The Don'ts

WHO Travel Advice

Stay Healthy While Traveling - slide 1 - Avoid travel if you have a fever and cough; If you have a fever, cough, and difficulty breathing seek medical care early and share previous travel history with your health care provider.
Stay Healthy While Traveling - slide 2 - Avoid close contact with people suffering from a fever and cough. Frequently clean hands by using alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water. Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth.
Stay Healthy While Traveling - slide 3 - When coughing and sneezing cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow and tissue - throw tissue away immediately and wash hands. If you choose to wear a face mask, be sure to cover mouth and nose - avoid touching mask once it's on. Immediately discard single-use mask after each use and wash hands after removing masks.
Stay Healthy While Traveling - slide 4- If you become sick while traveling inform crew and seek medical care early. If you seek medical attention, share travel history with your health care provider.

COVID-19 Infographic

McCandless, D., Starling, S., Kashan, O. (2020). COVID-19 #Coronavirus Infographic Datapack. Retrieved from https://informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/covid-19-coronavirus-infographic-datapack/

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